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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 1,181 (some duplicates have been removed)
load symbolizing his advocacy for education. in the back there's the silver beard. see after three years we hadn't gotten very far. the problem wasn't them but me. i was doing something we call micromanage meant. i had my receipts and i was determined to make this school getting built without losing one dollar and village chief one day came up to me and sat me down and said son, you need to do one thing, you need to sit down and be quiet and let us do the work and he took my receipts and records and locked them in an earthen locker and he came back with his british musket gun, when you fire it it blasts in your face and he came back and said everything will be fine. a l.a. willing. six weeks later the school got built. it was an important lesson to let go and let the communities be empowered and let them do they're work in entirety. it came time to open the school and kids came from all around and julia came all the way here from america. you could see this colorful lapel around they're neck that means bam! of courage. it's put around a newborn when they're first born to ward away
educator defined my professional path. when i recalled this dismissal in those two sentences, i am reminded of the thing that (inaudible) in the intervening years. however these 12 words are not only enough to express the challenges that my team and i have faced, but they stand for our triumphs as well. despite a skeptical and hostile environment, we survived. starting in the 80s with just 25 students started as the first chinese public school opened in san francisco in 1985. as i remember, i remember the quote, which would you teach chinese to them? i try to recall that and to what my colleague said has grown from a small pocket of multi-ethnic students to a student body comprised of many diverse socioeconomic backgrounds. i try to recall how hard we fought, administrator and parents and students and teachers alike. and what we each sacrificed to be be where -- to be where we are today. today i am humbled by my students who excel in two languages and our students are asked to demonstrate their chinese skills. today our graduates go to beijing, china to build bridges using their skills. to
with the culture. is how we treat one another? and i think we have to be very clear in our educational process and the communication to our people and what is acceptable behavior and what is unacceptable behavior, and i am often fearful when we try to develop a black letter law if you have all these factors and bullying and you fell outside and that works okay in the courtroom. right? as prosecutors we need clear understanding of the laws to understand whether we have a criminal violation or not, but i am fearful we maybe overly legalistic and the way we deal with on a daily basis and we need to approach this by a global perspective respecting people and understanding we have the same rights and obligations and starting with the adults and i go back to the adults because the adults really have to tow the line here. they really have to walk the talk. i cannot tell you how often i of involved in large mentoring efforts and now in two different places, in l.a. and arizona. i cannot tell you how often the teachers are the ones that set the tone whether we have a respectable environment or and
, and when you look at recent report that the federal department of education presented basically has the definition of bullying in every single state and also a list of i think 37 components and ranks that show you state by state which ones include those components of it. as we heard earlier the federal department is close to approving a federal definition of bullying, so i do believe there is a lot of work in this area. i also think there is a lot of work going on in terms of evidence based practices in terms of interventions that is very exciting. some of the information that we know is that about 80% of the bullying that goes on can pretty much be handled by some very prescribed ways of dealing with things. 20% requires really very targeted social emotional behavioral approach and i think that as we get better at that knowing what methods work with which kids we're going to come a long ways in terms of the interventions and then being successful with those. >> thank you. >> a lot of folks talked about the culture of a school and improving the culture of a school. when i was do
and hard working students find a dream of a college education out of their financial grasp and allow redundant regulations and red tape to strangle our economic growth in innovation, the california promise will still be broken. my friends and fellow 49er faithful, california is in the red zone thanks to your hard work. now is not the time to sit on the ball. this is a year for all of us to set a national example. this is the year to take advantage of the sunnier skies to repair our neglected roof and the year california stops settling for good enough and replaces it with great again. with that, it's my honor to introduce a leader who's doing exactly what he promised to do, to tell the truth. to get california's fiscal house in order to bring down the mountain of debt and to demonstrate that this state can be progressive without being profligate and above all else, continue to make the case that the best is yet to come. a big round of applause for our governor edmond brown. >> thank you mr. speaker, fellow constitutional officers. all my friends gathered here this morning. california
representing a wide area of government agencies, law enforcement agencies, service providers, educators and community members. we are committed to ending human trafficking through collaboration, education, outreach, raising awareness and supporting survivors of human trafficking. how many cities have this kind of public private cooperation? i don't know but we are among the first and speaks about the efforts put forth in the city but isn't this the city where all things that are impossible can happen? i wanted to just a few people who are here. first and foremost the honorable mayor ed lee. and supervisor carmen chu, has been a great champion. the winners of the sf cat annual poster concert and the keynote speaker, -- a human traffic survivor and advocate. i want to say that other human rights commissioners are here, -- and vice chair doug chen, -- commissioner, the president julie -- nancy kirshner rodriguez, police chief greg sur (sounds like) -- i will like to turn this over to mayor lee.diana are you here? he is on his way. well - thank you. why don't we do that? why waste a
heard the word innovation, i have to put a plug in for tradition. i have a very traditional education. i spent a lot of years in silence speaking latin up in the hills, living within the medieval framework. i do respect the past. we study it. if you are grounded in tradition, you feel quite confident in change and innovation. if you are insecure, you are very reluctant to embrace the unknown. i do think we need to in our education and politics, we have to have a new appreciation for our traditions and the patterns that describe our culture and our being as americans. having said all that, we have saved in california tens of billions in energy efficiency. when i first adopted those, people reacted negatively. we pushed ahead. and now in california we have ab 32. signed by a republican actor turned governor. promoting something i pick up on and promote further. the number of people in silicon valley defended ab23 against -- ab32 against an onslaught of texas oil companies. we defend when they tried to block your business. california gets 50% of the venture capital. there is a lot going on
, commissioner wynn. >> i wanted to point out that the board, the rules committee and the board of education it remains in the process of re-examining all of our policies. on which the rules of board is one section. that's why the format looks change. and not throughout here, and we are still in the process of doing that, and just to reiterate there are sections that we assigned to various committees not the rules committee. and the grounds commission and the curriculum section to the curriculum committee, etc.. and we hope to complete that this year. >> thank you, any other comments from the board? roll call. >> ly. >> yes. >> wong. >> yes. >> fewer. >> yes. >> haney. >> yes. >> mendoza. >> yes. dr. murase. >> aye. >> norton. >> aye. >> wynns. >> seven ayes. >> now we proceed to the annual election of officers for the board of education. as a reminder to the board and public, this election is by voice vote. and we do not need a second, and it's permisable for a member to vote for themselves. good to know. board members you will vote by name. if only one nomination, or more than you vote by
in helping us better understand the link between education and poverty. we all know there is a link between education and poverty, but jonathan, give me the top line of this new book, fire in the ashes, and the 25 years you spent with children and a link to poverty. >> cornell always gets my blood boiling because i agree with him so deeply. i was a young teacher in boston and a white guy living in the black community, and the black ministers did me an honor of letting me stand by his side the first time he came to preach in boston common, and his words changed my life forever. that is when i turned my back on an academic life and decided to teach fourth graders in our poorest neighborhoods. i get so angry on his birthday or on martin luther king day -- i heard politicians who turned their back totally on every single thing he lived and died for, never lifted a finger to bring an end to apartheid in schooling, which is now at a higher rate than it was the year he died, and they say, "i, too, had a dream." you cannot play games with the dreams of our prophets. dr. king did not say he had a dr
comfortable and i will tell you across race, across class -- maybe that's the way they do it. as an educator, can i? and as a responsibility we have to get power and empowering adults what they can do and the responsibilities are and to name discrete actions and this is bullying and this isn't and it's a much bigger frame about children and adults being safe and being fully present and we're are taking that on as a system and until that time we have done that i don't think we're going to see the real outcomes that we need that are focused ready to engage in communities the way that we need to. i can't give you this is bullying. this isn't. we're making progress in able to talk about it. >> richard. >> i agree everything tony said and as a teacher and administrator and i have children in the san francisco public schools to and this is about the power relationship that one individual has over another individual and the district attorney spoke about sometimes adults are part of the issue where an adult that holds the ability to give you a grade for example and you're a senior and you need
tend to be older men, educated in a certain way that didn't study such matters and most historians were not educated in the matter office -- matters of the heart and the hearth. but by studying the first ladies -- the first think thomas jefferson did after spending 1 days cooped up in a loft outside of philadelphia, writing the declaration of independence, the first thing he did was he went shopping for martha, his wife. he was pregnant and had had a miscarriage, and he bought her some gloves. then he begged off from serving for the rest of the summer so he could go home to be with his wife. every within -- every interof -- every winter of the revolutionary war, there was martha washington. i propose washington's closer advisor was alexander hamilton, and one chapter talks about hamilton's history of womanizing, bill clinton was not the first and was not the worst when it comes to misbehavior and high office. there's a long history. itot spitzer, arnold schwarzenegger, david petraeus, had nothing on alexander hamilton. if you read letters written by martha washington during those winter
a community center in the western addition and we talk about educating and supporting and one of the things that comes it my mind off the top is really talking to the people that are doing the bullying and understanding hurt people hurt people, right? as we're talking about this, there are two pieces and i'm wondering how do you integrate, we all talk about the finances and making things happen, but one is the mental health piece, the part about understanding where it's coming from, talking about a culture or a community, that's what they are used to. you tell people not to do that but as a child all you've heard is negativity and you've been beat up on and they talk bad to you. it's not just from one workshop you are going to change the mindset, how do we understand the mentality. the other is understanding the online/offline. we had alonzo coming in and speaking to us, they don't understand the impact, it's not enough for me to say we're going to do a workshop or a campaign, a poster thing, it's really about how do we change the culture of a community and a people and it's not just a o
, the culture. they want education, they want a better transit system. they always have ideas to improve the municipal transit system. but when the talk about the bay area, including silicon valley, it is the same thing. transportation symptom -- systems, central subway, high- speed rail. clearly, bart to san jose has been incredibly important to everyone, so that people could travel. i think there is a lot more maturity. there are many successful company that have already turned a corner on making a profit. start-ups have long-term views. they are not looking for instant gratification, as i believe the attitude was in the late 1990's, 2000's. people are talking a lot about issues on stability and asking government, like ours, to be with them in the long term, and to create relationships. certainly, for capital investors, it really is that relationship building. they want that face-to-face time with investors around our city. so we are creating conditions for that to happen. they are not short-term leases, these are long-term leases. twitter signed in for a good 10 years. others have sig
-- sorry, the june first day in june, june 2. we have reached an agreement with united educators for a two-year agreement. and both years have one-and-a-half of forced closure days. the half closure day is on the last day of school, noted on may 30. and then june 2 is the professional development day which also is a forced closure for our teachers. that's a furlough day. so we are pleased that in the school year is 179.5 days for the 13-14 year. and again those forced closure days may be revisited in the course based on the district and finances. >> okay. it's very timely as i got an e-mail today from someone asking me when the first day of school was in august. thank you for being so timely. >> thank you, madam president, this it will be the district website tomorrow. >> great, assuming we pass it. roll call please. >> ly. >> yes. >> wong. >> yes. >> fewer. >> yes. >> haney. >> yes. >> maufas,>> yes. >> murase. >> yes. >> wynns. >> yes. >> unanimous. >> thank you. next item is -- let's see, informational items. initial proposals. i announce the signing of the following two proposals. 2012
.7% of national income for jobs, training, education, for all the infrastructure, the environment, climate, technology, and forgetting who government? this is the hard truth, and what is likely to happen is to solidify this, because no one is speaking out for the government. we are talking about protecting entitlements. we are squeezing to nothing. the top do not pay. they have been given every way to get their money out tax-free, and it is trillions of dollars that have been lost in addition to what has been wasted in the censored wars. >> if i can get some quick response, jeffrey sachs was saying a while ago there is a bipartisan consensus that the poor do not matter, so they end up being more invisible. what is troubling for so many of us, you talk about a guy like lyndon johnson who made it very clear he knew he was writing off the south for the next 30 or 40 years by pushing the kinds of programs he pushed, the war on poverty. let me ask you a question i was going to ask the congress wouldn't -- the congresswoman. i will ask you, have the democrats abandoned for people -- poor people?
that. we need to first get to be fair. if someone's got a dollar and he's educated and he should be in the slot or should be voted for, he should be able to. forget about the billions that people have getting themselves into office. i think it's terrible. host: all right, robert. we're going to leave it there. we're going to take a break from our discussion regarding term limits for elected officials and talk about a decision that was handed down by the federal court of appeals yesterday. to talk to us about that, we're going to bring in josh hicks of the "the washington post," the federal blogger. welcome to the "washington journal." guest: thanks for having me. host: the lead in this morning's "the washington post," your paper, says boil boil officials -- says obama officials ruled in power, courts cut power of appointment, judges limit action during senate recesses. the president exceeded his constitutional authority by making appointments when the senate was on a break last year, a federal appeals court ruled friday the court's broad ruling would sharply limited power that pr
" and we have been around for about 32 years. we're nonprofit and we do both education and advocacy and on the education end we develop be curriculum and the curriculum is used widely across the country. it's in every state in the country and in canada and 70 countries around the world and programs we're familiar with is second step and i am hearing some nods and we have a -- idea of kind of what kind of things that we do, and i also do advocacy work so i come and speak at meetings like this. i was at the attorney general's meeting in washington state and i would like to congratulate you and especially those in law enforcement in california for the high level of discourse that you have incredibly impressed today by what i have heard and my hats off to you for all the good work you're doing. so i do advocacy and part of that is kind of reaching out to people and bringing the message of social emotional learning not just to schools because educators kind of get it. it's not a stretch when we talk to them why it's important to get it, but we want to take the message outside of the s
organization as a result of an agreement we have with the department of justice and department of education, so that we don't have any antitrust issues. that is an independent group. we at the american bar association are asking law schools to prepare for -- prepare 10 simple questions about what it costs to go to law school, how many of their students are employed upon graduation in real jobs, not artificial jobs, and we think it is going to be helpful. we also have a website that has a lot of information for anyone considering to go to law school, but probably the most important statistic that these potential students don't know is that the median income of lawyers in the united states is $62,000. they need to understand that before they incur $100,000 in debt. is there always room for another good lawyer? we need good lawyers. there always is. you have to ask yourself how much that you can afford -- how much debt you can afford. they have been watching too much "boston legal." you see $100,000 starting salaries. that may be for the top 10 students at the top 10 law schools. there were 30,000
was also nominated by president obama to serve in her role as assistant secretary of education for civil rights and she was confirmed by the senate in may of 2009. as assistant secretary, ruslyn is assistant secretary arnie's duncan's primary advisor. before she joined the department of education she was vice president of the education trust in washington, dc and was the founding executive of education trust west in oakland. in these positions she advocated for public school students in california, focusing on achievement and opportunity gaps, improving can urriculum and instructional quality and ensuring quality education for everybody. she served as an advisor on education issues on a number of private ipbs institutions, she is a teacher, a lawyer, and a very influential voice on all policy matters. she was also passionate about ending this issue of bullying and bringing everyone together to stop this disturbing trend so please welcome assistant secretary for civil rights, ruslyn lee. as i said, our moderator is not always our lieutenant governor, of course he needs to introducti
.s. attorney, representatives from the department of education confirm if we don't do anything about it, 13 million kids will become victims again for another year. some 3 million kids across the country will decide it is better to leave their school grounds than to continue their education. there will be more stupblting of the emotional and educational growth of our kids. all across the bay, whether working here in san francisco or alameda or sonoma or santa clara county. i want to thank you law enforcement officials here, instructors, community advocates, people who are concerned about our kids, they are our future and i would love to see a new generation of kids who don't know what bully is, who are not victims, who don't have those scars. but we've got to do today is sharing in the best practices, to be encouraged by programs like our roof top school here in san francisco who has traded a 50-person ambassador class that will talk about this, that will invite other kids, school administrators who have received the support of our school site administrators to encourage them to get this
have it khaifrpb the social norms. we must educate. but we must go beyond thinking more rigor will get us better achievement. we have to remember a school is a community and in a xhuept, people look out for each other. they've got each other's back. how do we begin to promote that idea that we are in this thing together? we believe it's through, unfortunately but truly, self-interest. kids are driven developmentally by the desire to fit in, to belong, to be part of an affinity group. if we can capitalize on their desire to look out for their friends and give them some more tools and opportunities and support, they will begin to do what we need them to do to at least confront it in their own small cell of social influence and the compounding and leveraging of that begins to make change. so the question we have to ask ourselves, are we as adults willing it slow down enough to invite kids to sit down at the table with us and partner? do we have the courage to understand that inclusion takes time and we have have to work more diligently to i invite young people, particularly marginaliz
in our community to support nonlaw enforcement efforts to reduce violence, whether it's education, social services, housing, none of that escapes us as to their link in efforts to reduce violence in our society. with that i want to thank everybody for coming today. and i would ask everyone in san francisco, if not the whole region and the state, to please join us in a national moment of silence that will occur tomorrow morning east coast time, it will be 9:30 a.m., and here in san francisco it will be 6:30 a.m. for a national moment of silence to remember all the victims in sandy hook. of course, at the same time, remember all the victims at our own locally it victims of gun violence. and before and after this moment of silence we will be active doing the things we need to do to reduce violence in our city. thank you. >> okay, good morning. thank you all for coming out today. we're very happy to be here. my name is ed rifkin, i'm the other ed, director of transportation. and as the transportation director, i oversee the sfmta which is the agency that is charged with implementing the city'
for the politician who is going to help them get their kid a better education or get their mother in a better situation for elder care facility. >> gavin: the frustration for me is you've got extraordinary people. i really believe this in politics who are trapped by an extraordinarily bad system you saw this with president obama who said i can't stand these super pacs but realized you cannot unilaterally disarm if you're in this game, and he would be crushed and rolled over. how do we reconcile that. good people trapped in a bad system. how do we ultimately manifest that. >> well, i think you need someone who breakaway and who will understand, and i believe this to be true, if they say i will not take super pac money that the people who hate the campaign finance system will come to them and say this is a different politician. >> gavin: yeah. >> and that is a tough choice. i appreciate that, but i do believe, in fact that in this day and age where the issue of money and politics is just pervasive and ordinary every day conversation that a candidate could be quite successful in this regard. >>
to dozens of schools where there were dramatic gains that were maintained. >> "the education of michelle rhee." >> frontlinis made possible by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. and by the corporation for public broadcasting. major support for frontline is provided by the john d. and catherine t. macarthur foundation, committed to building a more just, verdant and peaceful world. more information is available at macfound.org. additional funding is provided by the park foundation, dedicated to heightening public awareness of critical issues. and by the frontline journalism fund, supporting instigive porting and enterprise journalism. additional funding for this program is provided by: >> michelle rhee's journey to national prominence began in 2007. washington dc had just inaugurated a new mayor, adrian fenty. he had won a landslide election and promised to fix the district's abysmal school system. >> the lack of real opportunity for young people drives our unemployment rate, it drives our crime rate, and we can't have that. this is the nation's capitol o
another fronting something that was taking away from the value. they need education. when you go through the first process there is a checklist as to what you should be bringing in if you're going to the hearing. >> thank you so much. thank you ms. nelson. next we have shawn ridgell. okay. next we have daniel hershkowitz. >> how do you do? >> how do you do. >> please ask me the same question at the end. i am a real estate attorney and arrested broker in san francisco. i have been here for half of my life, true in a couple of months. i have been a real estate attorney for the last 15 years here san francisco and for a few years in oakland. for the last 12 years i have worked primarily as a real estate broker. i have quite a bit of experience with the appraisal process. i am a homeowner here in san francisco. that is in true; i have been a renter for the last two months; for the previous 15 years, an owner of single-family homes and a few condos and also the landlord. i understand all of those perspectives. i also was the president and secretary depending on the year of homeowners
, deeply grounded in our education and how it has prepared us as women and the leaders and the fact that your mom was very much an activist in the movement, and they need to know about it. i'm working on the book, this book. i said well, can i help you, can i get it published and that is how this journey began. >> bernice, when did your mother began her activism? she was born in marion alabama? >> i ron ackley if you study history, three of the leading movement, ralph abernathy and my father all have lives in alabama. how ironic is that. my mother didn't know one leader after that. she no one was much younger but they didn't know, you know, that kind of stuff and it just brought it all together. and so, growing up there in rural alabama with a father who was an entrepreneur early on and he called lumber and he did open an assault mel by a white gentleman. the father's determination to stand up to justice and continue to move to really influenced her and that produced a lot of the leaders in the nation. missionaries came and educated the reactive and why am i here driven by the fact
, really care about. education has always been very center to the things i have been involved with. i am a former teacher also. i work in the early childhood education field for 18 years running an organization. those are parts of my dna. other things that people are not aware of, i do care about health environment in san francisco. i want to make sure that we have enough health facilities to serve all san francisco, not just one part of the city. i want to make sure that our small businesses are supported. why? i come from a family where we had a small grocery store. i understand what it means to run a small business. maybe people think about 500 people is a small business. i'm talking about businesses that drive neighborhoods, support neighborhoods, give jobs to people in those neighborhoods. i want to work with others on the board of supervisors to improve the conditions support them , and make them thrive. those are some of the things, education, the economy. now that we are through the downturn, and dealt with the cuts, we want to make sure that is we improve the economy tha
on the san francisco public utilities commission and for the education plans for the choice aggregation and cleanpower sf program. >> okay. very good. colleagues it's a really as president torres as said it's a momentous occasion, historic occasion we had. we improved our relationship with shell and the allocation for the cleanpower sf and we're looking how the power can be maximized in the next year as we in fact the process of enrollment. i've actually believe that the timing of this could not be anymore -- anymore important to do today because of our global climate change that is happening, and i believe that we're seeing -- actually on the way here today i was listening to the radio. there was a report on democracy now that a portion of our artic ice about the size of the united states of america had melted this year which is significant to really alter what the temperature of the ocean is and we're seeing what really the impact of -- every year we're seeing dramatic examples of climate change and hurricane sandy being one of them. we're also seeing around the world real demogr
long enough to explain the differences as well and to educate on those nuances of renewable energy credit versus bundleeled kilowatt hours and it's complex and i don't know how long they will colerate -- tolerate us on the porch talking but that is a key part and the education component in order to survey them and what they think is an important part of it, so we will be conducting our third city wide customer survey in early january to test this new premium price that we have established and as well as this and the pg&e green tariff option is available to them. we will use the results of the surveys then to redine the roll out of the program. it will help us make sure we anticipate the right number of -- right percentage of opt out across the city, and we will take that heat map i showed you with the green and that survey will modify the specifics of that heat map again because we will have better information once again about customer acceptance of the program and then that wraps up the first quarter and we will have enough information then to come to the public utilities commis
>> good evening members of the board of education. congratulations new vice president fewer. don't mean to interrupt you while you are eating. and of course president norton, i believe president of the school board is the highest that anyone norton has risen since joshua crowned himself emperor. >> there is hope for me yet. >> we are talking about substitutes and like san francisco the sub -- substitutes are part of the union. they keep the classes going when teachers cannot be present. substitutes are the vice presidents for every teacher ready to step in and carry on if an emergency occurs. substitutes are the relief pitcher in the baseball of education. substitutes are the understudies to the teachers that star on stage. in california there are several categories of substitutes. we will talk about core substitutes and return to other substitute issues at future meetings. thank you very much. [applause] >> good evening, i am irvin. i am one of 15 core substitute teachers. we work at schools often covering the most difficult classrooms in the district. core substitutes are crede
as that is but that public safety means giving people the opportunity to have employment, the opportunity to educate themselves. public safety means that we don't take constitutional rights to the extreme and that while we may support the second amendment we have to support the fact that we have too many guns on the street. when we talk about making the city work for everyone, that it means helping our working families, our middle-class families that are struggling. if you look at what is happening throughout the city we have great wealth in san francisco that many people on the been pushed out. the city of st. francis has the lowest percentage of kids, lower than manhattan, -- i want to thank my colleagues to help the families can find the city more affordable. to have a city that works, you have to make sure the public education work for our kids. we have the highest performing urban school district in the entire state, and one of the highest performing urban school districts in the country and yet many kids especially kids of color are doing worse in san francisco than kids of col
to schools because educators kind of get it. it's not a stretch when we talk to them why it's important to get it, but we want to take the message outside of the school into the media, into the communities, into families so that people kind of understand this process of another way of learning and becoming an educated person. a couple of other things i do i work with anne on the board and with the foundation. that has been exciting. i do advising for sesame street. if you have small children the next seafn sesame street you will see some of the favorite characters and breathing and learning problem solving models and we're very excited -- >> [inaudible] >> and they're focusing on self regulation and other skills and specific focus and exciting working with them the past year and a half or so so i want people to have a look here, and what i would like to do is tie some of the things together that you have been hearing about today and in terms of bullying prevention, other prevention work going on in your state and in terms of promoting positive behaviors with youth, and so sometimes
what would you invest in?" . i would invest in education and we're not investing in the future of the children and the in the country and the global future of our world and i agree absolutely with everything you said. we're short changing our kids and not giving teachers the resources. there is mold in the teacher's work room. if i worked in the building that many children go to school in i wouldn't go to work either and in answer to your question there is a priority here about education that's not quite right. >> and while we're earmarking money i would totally support that and i feel that we should train teachers in digital media. you can't teach cooking out a kitchen, so we need to bring digital media into the classroom so people can practice in the environments they're in all the time outside of school. >> and i would say that having listened to the word "media literacy" as far as back when i was carrying 3-inch quarter cassettes years ago and it was a great job. it really was. to teach media and digital literacy out of context is a fool's error and we have the boring
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 1,181 (some duplicates have been removed)

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